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across north africa beginning with egypt, i've asked our speakers to limit the remarks to roughly seven minutes in order to reserve plenty of time for your questions and answers. dr. anthony and the organizers as always have provided with a series of thought-provoking questions, and as with previous panels, question cards we available to you. so first, i'd like to call on karim who is a visiting professor, and served as a great egyptian diplomat with direct experience in egypt's diplomacy towards middle east regional security, arms control and nonproliferation issues. is also a veteran of the egyptian information and political military affairs office here in washington. so it offers a unique insight into the delicate relationship new leaders find themselves maneuvering in. mr. haggag, thank you. >> thank you, and i'd like to thank the council for this opportunity. it's a pleasure to be here with you today. i'd like to focus my remarks on foreign policy, particularly the challenges facing the new egyptian government in the foreign policy and region security realm, but i can set the conce
'll also visit egypt and the west bank city of ramallah. and while the two sides are trading cease-fire proposals, israel's ambassador tells erin burnett his country is ready to launch a full-scale ground invasion. we talk to our reporter in phnom penh. she's been following the secretary of state. she departed just a few minutes ing aheaded to the middle east. good morning, jessica. what can you tell us about the secretary of state's mission? >> reporter: hi, john. good morning. the secretary of state is headed now to israel, ramallah and egypt to see if she can work with those three partners to try -- well, not partners -- but those three interests to see if she can help fashion some sort of a cease-fire. her trip was announced here in cambodia by a white house official, ben rhodes, with the national security council. and he made it very clear that in the white house's view, the primary onus is on hamas to take the first step in starting this truce by stopping their rocket fire into israel. listen to what he had to say. >> the bottom line still remains that hamas has to stop this
egypt in tunnels. coming literally through the country of egypt. the problem is they are coming from iran. in to egypt. in to the tums and in the gaza strip. they are shot from gaza to tel aviv. david lee mentioned today, but tell avive has seen missiles and jerusalem here, tel aviv ssiles are going this way. the issue here, this is hamas. hamas is a terrorist organization who are targeting population, civilian population centers within israel. that's why israel is retaliating with so many strikes back to the gaza strip. hezbollah and palestinians are more than willing to violate some geneva act, war crimes targeting the civilians. >> dana: they will. we want bob's take on this. first, listen to president obama who said america does stand with israel. >> there is no country on earth that would tolerate missiles raining down on its citizens from outside its borders. so we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes. >> dana: that is president obama. of course, the leader of israel has words to say as well. listen to him. >> i hope th
for greg. ♪ >> shannon: the u.s. and egypt brokeer a cease-fire but will it hold up? this is "special report." >> shannon: good evening. i'm shannon bream in for bret baier. secretary of state hillary clinton announced truce after a week of retaliation for hamas rocketfire. in a region where they come and go like the seasons, there are concerns how long it can last. we begin in southern israel. >> restaurant, mile from the border, rest of the soldiers like the rest of the country watch noose announcing a cease-fire. officials mediate the deal. as did the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. who arrived yesterday in the middle east. >> we will work to consolidate the process, provide security for people of israel. >> half an hour before the truce was scheduled to take effect, benjamin netanyahu spoke to the country. >> i know there are citizens expecting more reangst. we should use this opportunity to achieve a long lasting cease-fire. >> barrage of rockets targeting israel. minutes after there is a border town. >> part of the agreement is israel will stop the targeted assassinatio
. and that egypt will be playing a new and central role in the process. right now, though, both the netanyahu government and hamas are claiming victory. >> after eight days of israeli raids, the main market in gaza is returning to business as usual. many palestinians see the ceasefire as a victory for how moscow. >> the resistance has changed the rules of the game, disrupting israel's military goals. i say to the palestinian people in gaza, the west bank, and everywhere, and the entire arab world, the idea of invading does that is over and will never again return, god willing. >> but israeli prime minister netanyahu also speaks of a victory. he says all israeli military and political goals have been achieved. >> we have achieved a number of great successes and struck at the heart of hamas. we have killed their leaders and destroyed thousands of rockets threatening israel. we will react with force again if the cease-fire is broken. ben netanyahu needs military successes, but israelis remain skeptical. >> today, may be they will not fire. tomorrow may be not, but next week, next year, next mont
troops are poised at the border, ready to move at gaza. negotiations speer headed by egypt are ongoing, and tonight the united nations secretary-general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo, just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease-fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since it began its bombing campaign last wednesday. ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. ben, how are civilians dealing with this conflict? some of those numbers we hear, 870 people injured are frightening. >> yeah, they're not dealing very well with i
of government and that our impression is that the presidency, the foreign ministry, the other agencies of egypt have worked together cohesively with in relation to hamas and to israel to try to bring about a ceasefire. so we have to support their efforts. >> dr. julian lewis. >> does the foreign secretary agree that the greater stride towards peace was when president sadat signed the treaty between egypt and israel, and does he, therefore, share my disappointment of the statement recently by president morrissey of -- morsi of egypt that the president situation is an act of aggression solely by the israelis? >> well, while that statement is different from what he or i might say about the origins of this, nevertheless, i hope my honorable friend will bear in mind the answer i gave to the previous question about the very constructive role being played by egypt. my experience and the prime minister's experience in meeting president morsi is that he wants a peaceful future for his country, he has not turned against the peace treaty with israel. he knows the importance of now building up the economy
erupting in egypt after president muhammad morsi grants himself new and far-reaching powers. live pictures as the president speaking right now. that's muhammad morsi, as hundreds of egyptians are protesting in tahrir square today. morsi's opponents clashing with supporters in cities all over egypt. we're now hearing protesters storming the office of the muslim brotherhood and throwing out books and chairs and other things onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the ne
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
, to come before cameras in egypt and announce a period of calm. but that announcement has not happened. instead, the office of the e jimgs president, mohamed morsi, told cnn the egyptian government has no plans to make an announcement tonight. since wednesday of last week militants have fired hundreds of rockets into israel. we're about to bring you one family's harrowing story of dodging the rocket that hit their home today. random attacks like this provoke ferocious air assaults on gaza by the israelis, which also continued today. [ gunfire ] about two hours ago a reuters camera in gaza city caught this explosion. cnn's ben wedeman reports a building near the city was likely hit by an israeli air strike in gaza. he was on live with hala gorani when the explosion happened. take a look. >> i think it's pretty clear that we are moving in the direction of -- [ gunfire ] i can hear shattering glass out there right now. the building just shook of course because i was looking at the camera i didn't see where the blast took place. anybody see it? okay. to the north of this building here. so
. >>> and now to egypt. demonstrators there have taken to the streets in cairo to protest against president mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks have calmed down considerably in cairo's tahrir square. still demonstrators out in tahrir, especially those who pitched tents overnight but the numbers not as what we saw on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express wha
developing today in egypt. what we're told is a volatile of mix of protestors gathered to denounce a recent power grab by their democratic leader. earlier we saw violent clashes as president mohammed morsi said the far reaching powers he just granted himself, basically saying he can ignore the courts are just temporary. the thousands gathered in the streets of kaj roar not so sure. they are making their doubts known with a round of protests this afternoon. coming up we will speak with ralph peters about what happened to the promise of democracy in this country and what the rice of a powerful group of islamic hard liners means to america. ralph says the future of egypt is literally on the line today. there was also some breaking news a couple of hours ago in the fast and furious investigation, that's the gun-running sting operation gone bad. and then the probe that led to a multiyear knock down drag out fight between congress and the department of justice, the one wanting the documents and the facts, and the department of justice not wanting to turn it all over. you may remember that attorne
the president of egypt morsi, and the president of turkey. this is all part of an ongoing effort, as i pointed out to keep the violence escalating. there are positive indications of some movement there, but still, this violence ongoing there, viktor. >> there's a lot, dan, to discuss about the trip and this asia summit. it was really telling, and i truly sent it out through a tweet when someone asked about burma, and the president said this is not an endorsement. it's an acknowledgment of the reform. tell us more about the message for this trip. >> the president is responding to some criticism from some corners saying this visit is too soon. the administration did send secretary of state hillary rodham clinton healthing there last year, and they have an ambassador there, and many believe that's enough because it is the beginning of a long journey, the administration says, essentially the first few miles of a long journey. what the president -- the point the president was trying to make and others inside the administration is if you were to sit back and wait for there to be a perfect democracy
identities. the fact that in egypt, the first thing they say is raise your head, you are an ejection, meaning be proud. so the question then is what happened? if this was true for a decade. there was nothing particularly unique about 2007 or 2011. whether there was a major economic crisis in egypt or tunisia. it was extraordinary and i don't think you can just blame it on economics. so the question is why didn't they do it before? i think we have the right answer. political sponsors have always assumed that it is not enough to have angry people to revolt. you have to organize and you have to get a lot of people through the streets and the government has to feel the heat. the fact you have a lot of angry people doesn't quite make it. governments understood that you can can't get people to the streets about organizing. the outline political parties. they kept tabs on social institutions. they put leaders in prison that challenge them. and they were under control. that is why some people are with us for the long haul. what happened over the last couple of years, we have been watching for a decad
's a bit of hope for a negotiated cease-fire. leaders from egypt and france are trying to mediate. for the past five days israel and hamas have fired rockets and bombed one another, israeli air strikes have taken a heavy toll on gaza and hamas. right now israel is keeping open the possibility of a ground offensive. they've got 30,000 troopons the border with another 75,000 reservists being called up. now, i want to show you something that played out live on israeli television just a short time ago. watch this. what you're called is called an iron dome. this is egypt's defensive zone system. they're tracking down two rockets. at the end, the small puffs there, that's the signals of success that those intercepters headed off those rockets. so far israel says a thousand rockets have been fired. hamas puts it at about 900. the constant threat has those in israel in fear. >> reporter: there's another attack, another rocket alert going on. we've got to get out of here. >> go, fred. there you see it. a strike in ash colon. we've got the pictures up as fred and our camera crew get out of
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
that year coming up just a week later, israel invaded egypt. and they did it with the secret support of two major u.s. allies. france and england. it was a fight over control of the suez canal. the american president at that time, in 1956, was, of course, dwight eisenhower. republican. he was running for re-election against the democratic candidate that year, adlai stevenson. talk about an october surprise. that year it was eight days before election day. both candidates are forced to deal with an unexpected and genuine giant foreign policy crisis. >> on sunday the israeli government ordered total mobilization. on monday, their armed forces penetrated deeply into egypt and to the vicinity of the suez canal, nearly 100 miles away. and on tuesday, the british and french governments delivered a 12-hour ultimatum to israel and egypt, now followed up by armed attack against egypt. the united states was not consulted in any way about any phase of these actions. nor were we informed of them in advance. >> president eisenhower sounding kind of mad, right? the u.s. had not been informed about the at
. >>> plus, the people of egypt trying to avoid trading one dictator for another. fighting back against a president who gave himself new powers. tonight a potential crisis point as the leader tries to put himself above the law. and how will the u.s. handle this? >>> plus, the chances of winning are ridiculously low. but millions of us are still lining up for a shot at a record powerball jackpot. >> lucky, lucky, lotto win. >> shepard: tonight a look at the actual odds of winning it all. but first from fox this tuesday night, three republican senators now say they cannot support the u.n. ambassador, susan rice, for secretary of state. at least until they get more answers about her comments about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. president obama has not yet even nominated her. but the white house says she is enormously qualified. senators john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte say they're even more troubled now after meeting with ambassador rice. the attack on libya on september 11 killed the u.s. ambassador, cries stevens and three other americans. five days later, amba
next, a lot of people in egypt are not happy with their country's president. [ male announcer ] red lobster's crabfest ends soon. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like ourender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart
us back to the middle east that we used the to know the arabs and israelis going at it and egypt being -- [inaudible] but right before that iran saw its fortunes decline, its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation introduced a very, very important element, almost sectarian element, that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this, of course, goes into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons. this is a good time to start negotiating with iran as its reach in the middle east seems to be not what it used to be, it's not as soft power, superpower, nor is it a hard power superpower in the renal payoff the situation -- in the region because of the situation in lebanon and syria. p lebanon is really the coming disaster, and syria is the disaster that we're dealing with right now. so, of course, all of this will go on. and if i were american, i would say this is exactly the right time to go into this. the presidential elections are
clinton heading into the region at this hour. she's going to be meting with leaders in israel, in egypt, in ramallah, that's going to start tomorrow. the israelis carrying out more than 80 air strikes overnight. 95 rockets back across the border. 38 palestinians killed in the last 24 hours. cnn has the conflict covered from all sides. christiane amanpour is live in jerusalem, arwa damon is on the ground in gaza city, richard plight again is in ashkelon in israel, jessica yellin is live in cambodia where secretary clinton has departed heading for the middle east. we begin with christiane. welcome. give us a sense of this new announcement from israel. how long do you think israel is waiting to silt on this halt before it would move forward with sending ground troops in? >> well, what was reported was that a senior government official in the loop close to the talks has confirmed to me this morning that after the latest intense round of conversations and meetings between prime minister netanyahu and his inner security cabinet, which went on into the early morning hours here jerusalem time,
a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his top advisors today, and he said he'll consider that, but first there needs to be a dialogue. let's take a listen to the advisor. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president. not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible -- >> we are ready for our dialogue. >> are you prepared to consider rescinding adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. accepting it we may have some reservations, but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not two backward. mr. morsi
in alexandria, egypt where the british had a large fleet. and the two biggest but not quite finished battleships of the french fled to the car, west africa, and casablanca. but there was a very large flotilla on the algerian coast. there were a couple of battleships, some big cruisers, and the british came up with this idea. they called it operation catapult. on the morning of july 3, they were going to seize as many french ships as they possibly could buy agreement, hopefully, but if not, by force. and they figured, and portsmouth and plymouth, england, these ports are surrounded by british ships and british coastal batteries and that kind of thing. and in alexandria egypt kind of the same thing because there was a british port with the british origin big guns. there was only the french flotilla here, was a french naval base. and the british naval command, radioed of course in code to their fleet in gibraltar, and they said, this is what you have to do. you have to sail through the ninth of july 2 and 3rd, and show up at dawn. and give our terms to the fleet. and the terms were, or were going t
launch lar-sca retaliation, further fueling the conflict. >>> egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel to protest the killing of the hamas military leader. egypt is one of the few arab countries with diplomatic ties to israel. but president mohamed morsi belongs to the muslim brotherhood which has close relations to hamas. morsi has called for an emergency meeting of the arab league to discuss the killing. >>> the leaders of asia's top economies want to work out a free trade agreement. ramin mellegard joins us from the business desk. there are so many trade negotiations going on worldwide. what are the details in this case? >> catherine, representatives of japan, china, and south korea are trying to get together this month to talk about starting negotiations for a free trade pact. the countries have agreed there are benefits to strengthening economic ties as the move towards free trade accelerates worldwide. leaders of the three countries had agreed in may that they would begin the trade negotiations by the end of this year. preparations had been made in working-level meetings but pros
have come thick and fast. iran called the attacks organized terrorism. egypt's foreign minister called for a formal u.n. security council meeting to discuss the attacks. and said they must end. >> translator: egypt strongly condemns the israeli air strike in the gaza strip and the kellings of civilians and the assassination. we strongly condemn it. >> and wide gdemonstrations turned violent. in spain, riot police fired rubber bullets. and in lisbon, protesters tore down barricades lobbing rocks and bottles. workers also protested in greece, france and well engine against government policies that have driven up unemployment. the gdp is expected to sling by 0.2% in the third quarter pushing the bloc officially into recession territory. the eurozone downturn is taking its toll on germany. they had resilience tocrisis. economists are warning country could see a further contraction in the last three months of the year as dim prospects for the currency bloc continue to weigh on consumer and business sentiment. following this for us is still via ve still radio silva a vo [ silva a vod have a
a civil war on israel's doorstep. testy relations with egypt, not to mention the palestinians. it is really not good timing. >> not really. there's no immediate reason behind this attack. the man killed was a very closely cooperating with the israeli side. whenever the israelis had the impression to many rockets were being fired from the gaza strip, it was him who the israelis contacted in order to crush this rocket fire in from the gaza stip. at the same time, he was negotiating with israelis on stopping any violent activity between the two sides, and yet, the israelis decided to kill him. why is it at this stage? we had elections in the united states last week, and there will be elections in israel next month, so this action gives a clear opportunity for mr. benjamin netanyahu to show that he is a strong man, that he is able to handle this challenge as he sees it from his position, by the palestinians. >> israel is just saying it is defending itself against palestinian rocket attacks. what is the trigger for all of this violence? >> we have been watching these events develop
. around our house, all are civilians. no one is firing. >> egypt has denied reports to be arranged a truce. >> for more on the high stakes of this escalating violence, i folk with former senator george mitchell. -- i spoke with former senator george mitchell. thank you very much for joining me. neither side appears to be backing down. this is not going to be over in a few days. just how serious is this? could we be seeing the start of the war? >> it is a very serious issue. i've been saying for some time, nearly a year, there was a will that had created a false sense of security on all sides. the real danger is not so much from the internal conflict within gaza, it is given the highly unstable and volatile situation in the region, this could be a spark that lights a conflict that extent in other unpredictable ways. it is a very serious matter. >> are you seeing any signs of that happening imminently? >> there is a long pattern in history. neither side appears to be backing down. that is in the case in the past. in the past, they have found in their mutual interest to establish a cease-fire
was aimed of brokering a ceasefire or whether was a show of solidarity with hamas. egypt is at the center of international efforts to mediate a truce between israel and hamas. u.s. secretary general ban ki moon is lending his support. >> my message is clear. all sides must avoid fire. further escalating the situation will put the entire region at risk. >> our leaders, he traveled to jerusalem with talks -- to talk with benjamin netanyahu. he condemned the attacks and the loss of civilian lives in gaza. netanyahu reiterated that they would be willing to are dissipate in a ceasefire but only if hamas immediately sees as the rocket attacks. >> the long-term solution to be put in place through diplomatic means and israel then would be a willing partner to such a solution, but if kroger military action through the necessary to stop the constant barrage of rockets, israel will not hesitate to do what is necessary to defend our people. >> there are signs that diplomatic efforts may be bearing fruit and mediators iran optimistic that a deal can be made to avert an israeli ground offensive. >> --
, but we need more details of what is exactly means. the first point is that egypt is the guarantor of the cease-fire. >> let's talk about the role of egypt here. it has been a huge test of egyptian diplomacy and for its new president. is this a victory for him, would you say, or did hillary clinton's intervention make a big difference? >> no, i think it is certainly a victory. by the way, lots of praise from the americans for the mediating role of the egyptians. for now, if the ceasefire stands and will hold, which is of course still a question, it will be seen as a success story. >> thanks for that from cairo. all right, let's go straight over to gaza. what is the latest? is it quiet? >> it is relatively quiet, i would say. we still hear a lot of drums in the air. in the past hour, it brought some of rockets, but now at the moment, i would say it is quite -- in the past hour, a barrage of rockets, but now at the moment, i would say it is quiet. people still wonder if the cease-fire will be implemented. over the past few days, there was a lot of talk, and we do not see a lot of peo
. in egypt, tens of thousands have taken to the streets of cairo last night to protest against the decree by the egyptian president mohamed morsi that grants him sweeping constitutional powers. >> reporter: hundreds of thousands of egyptians have poured into tahrir square and cities all across egypt demanding that president mohamed morsi rescind his decision that granted him sweeping powers. they say it is reminiscent of the mubarak era, sending this country back to dictatorship. for the past five days, police have clashed with protesters, firing tear gas and beating them at times. more importantly, they are demanding that egypt's new constitution is one that reflects the diversity of egypt, not the sole control of the muslim brotherhood. many of the people here are angered by what they say is the attempt by the muslim brotherhood and the president mohamed morsi to take control of the country and ram pole their agenda at the expense of secular forces like those that have gathered behind my. >> neil sheering still with us. investors have gotten quite bullish on egypt. do you think the inve
. the body writing egypt's new constitution has been voting on the final draft. >> the assembly is signing off on that document bit by bit. they voted controversially to keep islamic law as the main source of legislation. most of the political opposition is boycotting the assembly. the document aims to transfer more power to egypt's parliament. critics say it is being rammed through too hastily. critics have already gathered where the president is expected to make an announcement. british lawmakers are looking at new ways to regulate the press. the calls for tougher guidelines come after an enquiry's report on crimes committed by reporters as they sought out sensational news stories. >> the inquiry picked up its work after 10 reporters were arrested at rupert murdoch's "news of the world" newspaper. among the charges, bribing the police. the inquiry has found the violations span decades. >> as the inquiry findings were read, activists gathered to protest what they termed robert murdoch's media mafia. the report found that reporters had routinely -- routinely packed into phones of celebriti
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
, who is egypt's first freely elected president is trying to establish a dictatorship. morsi is meeting today with the country's highest judicial authority in a bid to defuse this crisis. reza sayah is live in cairo. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: john, let's bring you up to speed. as we speak, egyptian president mohamed morsi meeting with egypt's top judges, seven of them representing the supreme judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses his decrees. we spoke to one of mr. morsi's top advisers earlier today. we asked him if that was a possibility. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president
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